Now is the ideal time to review your building compliance plan for 2019

The beginning of a new year is the perfect time to check you are up to date with the building compliance obligations for your property portfolio – and plan for the 2019 year.

Check your Building Compliance is up to date with this simple checklist

First, confirm that:

  • Your BWOF for each building is displayed, and current
  • Your Inspection Logs and Manual  are up to date and filed for easy access and updating
  • You have forms ready in your log book, or manual, for you and your IQP’s to record the inspections for the year ahead
  • You have a schedule for the Owner’s Inspections you will be carrying out and have added these dates to your calendar or diary
  • Any new installations have the necessary consents, and details of the new systems have been provided to Argest to get your Compliance Schedules up to date
  • Your maintenance and service contracts for Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Units, Lifts, and other Specified Systems that have this as a requirement under the Building Act, are in place
  • Maintenance checks are being done on Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Units, Lifts, and other Specified Systems that have this as a requirement under the Building Act.

Cost implications of Building Compliance

When planning for your Building Compliance, you will need to consider the following in your budget for the 2019 year:

  • Your budgeted expenses will cover the likely increases in Council fees and charges for compliance services. You can check with your local council or Argest for information on your area
  • Ensure you have contingencies for council audits – both for time available, and remediation funding – as audits are increasing in frequency and depth of review.
  • Argest can provide a consulting service to assist you manage the audit process and council negotiation if required.

Finally, if you have new staff that will be completing Owner’s Inspections, or looking after your Building Compliance processes, make sure they have been trained on how to carry out and record inspections properly.  Argest can provide training on what is required under the Building Act to you, and your new staff.

If you need any help or advice on your Building Compliance, Argest is here to help

Please contact us on 0800 ARGEST or online now.

Strengthening MBIE’s role as building regulator

A recent review showed Building System Performance (BSP) is the regulatory system within MBIE that needs the most attention to improve performance. Following that review, BSP is being transformed to shape the building regulatory system to meet New Zealand’s current and future needs.

General Manager BSP Anna Butler says, “The work MBIE and BSP does matters – building and construction make a significant contribution to our nation’s economy and social wellbeing.”

See the full article on the MBIE Website.

Minimal compliance on quake standards

By Phil Pennington for Radio NZ.

Fewer than 34 multi-storey New Zealand buildings have fully complied with earthquake restraints standards since they were introduced in 1983, including in the Christchurch rebuild, says Restraints specialist Terry Johnson, of Masterton.

Johnson consulted on the Christchurch justice precinct project and said as far as he knew only two of the buildings in the whole rebuild were up to the NZS4219 restraints standard.

Ceilings and services – pipes, ducts, heavy air-conditioning units and the like – were heavily damaged in the Christchurch 2011 and Wellington 2013 and 2016 earthquakes, such as at the BNZ Harbour Quays and Statistics New Zealand quayside buildings.

Typically, such damage accounts for up 70 percent of the cost of repairs after a quake.

Read the full Radio NZ article.

Image is BNZ corporate office, Pipitea, Wellington. Photo: Screenshot / GoogleMaps

Call to consolidate building compliance

Zaryd Wilson for the Wanganui Chronicle

Mainstreet Whanganui has called for a one-stop shop to help landlords understand building compliance requirements. The organisation, which represents businesses and property owners within Whanganui’s central business district, says each particular area of compliance involved dealing with a different organisation or department.

Mainstreet acting chairman Peter Robinson told the Whanganui District Council’s statutory management committee that owners often had to deal with a raft of issues including resource consent, building consent, fire regulations and heritage rules. The organisation wanted a working group formed to help building owners understand what was required of them.

Read the full article in the NZ Herald.